Nov 102014
 

515th MONTHLY MEETING

November 21st, 2014

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All monthly meetings are open to the public. If you are interested in insects, please join us!
Members may bring exhibits for show-and-tell. If you have photos, video, or other media to share, please email the society.

CALENDARS FOR SALE! The calendar photo contest is over, you can see the winners HERE
Click HERE to purchase a calendar

Calendars will be available at the meeting. Any pre-ordered calendars can be picked up at the meeting, or will be reserved and shipped once the meeting is over.

SPEAKER: Phil Armstrong

TITLE: The Diversity of Mosquito-borne Viruses in Connecticut

Now that the mosquitoes are done buzzing around our heads for the season, Phil Armstrong of the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station will tell us about the dangers lurking in those little blood-suckers.

“Research focuses on the molecular evolution and epidemiology of mosquito-borne viruses transmitted in New England, including eastern equine encephalitis, Jamestown Canyon, and West Nile virus.  Genetic relationships of these viruses are compared to track the origin, spread, and long-term persistence of strains involved in disease outbreaks and to identify variants associated with different ecological niches and/or disease outcomes. Other projects evaluate the role of different mosquito species to serve as vectors of arboviruses by determining their host-feeding and virus-infection patterns in nature. In addition, our group develops and evaluates diagnostic assays to rapidly detect new and established arboviruses transmitted in the U.S.”

Dinner

  • 6:30pm, catered

Meeting:

  • 7:30pm, Yale University
  • Kline Geology Auditorium, 210 Whitney Ave (next to the Peabody) (Map)

Links:

Phil Armstrong’s page at CAES

 

 

 

Oct 212014
 

It’s time to vote in our yearly calendar photo contest!

CLICK HERE TO VOTE

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You can choose up to 12 favorites. Please only vote once, but you can encourage your family and friends to participate.

Voting will close October 24th – this is a quick voting period to ensure we can put the calendar together and have it ordered/delivered in time for the November meeting.

Oct 062014
 

514th MONTHLY MEETING

October 17th, 2014

All monthly meetings are open to the public. If you are interested in insects, please join us!
Members may bring exhibits for show-and-tell. If you have photos, video, or other media to share, please email the society.

CALENDAR CONTEST SUBMISSIONS: Please submit one or two photos to our photo contest! All current members may participate. Please see THIS PAGE for details. The deadline is October 15, and we will begin voting at the meeting.

SPEAKERSClaire Rutledge and Kirby Stafford

TITLE: Response to Emerald Ash Borer in Connecticut

Claire and Kirby, both of the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, are going to discuss the ways in which Connecticut is responding to the threat of the Emerald Ash Borer.

Dinner

  • 6:30pm, catered in the auditorium

Meeting:

  • 7:30pm, Yale University
  • Kline Geology Auditorium, 210 Whitney Ave (next to the Peabody) (Map)

Social gathering:

  • TBD

Links:

See the Ag station’s page on the Emerald Ash Borer here

 

 

 

Sep 122014
 

This year, international rock flipping day (started in 2007) is September 14th. But you can celebrate every day!

“The point is simply to have fun, and hopefully learn something at the same time. We don’t want to over-determine what that something should be: those of a more scientific frame of mind might focus on IDs or ecological interactions, while those of an artistic or poetic bent could go in a different direction entirely…

Whatever you do, please be sure to replace all rocks that you flip as soon as possible, so as not to disrupt the natives’ lives unduly.”

 

See this post by Gwen Pearson to learn more. She blogs at Wired.com, with her column “Charismatic Minifauna”. She is a wonderfully witty entomologist, I highly recommend following her pieces.

Sep 112014
 

The Connecticut State Museum of Natural History is offering a variety of outreach programs this fall, one of which is on using stream insects to evaluate water quality. It sounds like a fun event for adults and children alike, see their website for more details!

Paula Coughlin, Science Educator
Saturday, September 27, 10 am to 12 noon
Pomfret, CT (directions will be sent to participants)
Advance registration required: $15 ($10 for Museum members)
Adults and children ages 5 and above. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Connecticut’s streams play an important role in maintaining a healthy environment. While they may appear to be crystal clear, the water quality in some streams can be questionable. The presence of certain aquatic insects can be indicators of water quality as some types of aquatic life are more sensitive to pollutants than others. Join naturalist and science educator Paula Coughlin and explore a small stream to learn about a community of aquatic insects that are water quality indicators. Bring appropriate footwear for moderate hiking and boots or old sneakers that can get wet. Dress for mucking about in the stream. Special nets and waders will be provided during this family friendly activity.

Registration form can be found here.

Sep 102014
 

513th MONTHLY MEETING

September 19th, 2014

All monthly meetings are open to the public. If you are interested in insects, please join us!
Members may bring exhibits for show-and-tell. If you have photos, video, or other media to share, please email the society.

Welcome back! The academic year is underway, and we have a great set of talks lined up for the society. In addition to this month’s speaker we will be discussing the calendar photo contest (get those last macro shots of the year in before the weather turns!), advertising the society at other universities, potential outreach events, and other trips we can take as a society.

SPEAKER: Sam Jaffe

TITLE: The Caterpillar Lab – experiments in natural history education

Sam is going to tell us about The Caterpillar Lab’s success in bringing insects to the public in New England through various shows, outreach programs, museums, and open hours in the lab. He would especially like to start a discussion about how to help teachers bring insects into the classroom, and how others in the society can get involved in entomological outreach. His talk will feature lots of great photos and videos!

Dinner

  • 6:00pm, Willington Pizza House (menu)
  • 25 River Road (Route 32), Willington, CT 06279 (map)

Meeting:

  • 7:30pm, University of Connecticut
  • Biology and Physics Building rm 130, 91 North Eagleville Road, Storrs, CT 06269 (map)

Social gathering:

  • TBD

Links:

  • The Caterpillar Lab facebook page
  • Sam is an accomplished macro photographer. His work can be found here.

 

May 092014
 

512th MONTHLY MEETING

May 16th, 2014

ANNUAL POTLUCK DINNER

malcolm beetleAll monthly meetings are open to the public. If you are interested in insects, please join us!
Members may bring exhibits for show-and-tell. If you have photos, video, or other media to share, please email the society.

This month is our final meeting of the academic year, our annual potluck. Family and friends are welcome, please bring a dish to share, and stay overnight to collect insects if you’d like!

SPEAKER:

Our featured speaker will be Stan Malcolm, a UConn alumnus who has joined the festivities in the Wagner lab. The title of his talk will be: Collaborative Stridulation and Courtship Behavior in Forked Fungus Beetles

LOCATION:
Session Woods is located at: 341 Milford Street (rt 69), Burlington CT
Map and directions HERE
The meeting will be held in the conference room.

We will be able to collect insects at night, so weather permitting, we will be setting up blacklights and sheets. Feel free to bring your own collecting equipment and lights!We will also be allowed to camp overnight, for those who do not wish to travel late (or really want to check the sheets all night).

IF YOU PLAN ON CAMPING, PLEASE RSVP by emailing the society.

FOOD:
This is our annual pot-luck banquet, so please bring a dish to share (please also include a list of ingredients for those with food allergies). Cooking with insects is encouraged! (I’ll be cooking up something with crickets and waxworms, for sure).
ELECTION:
Officer elections for next year will take place. Anyone interested in running should email the society.
EVENTS:
Like past years, we will be holding a silent auction. Please bring any entomological items (books, collecting supplies, artwork, etc) you wish to donate. And remember to bring cash or a checkbook to purchase any auction items.
PLANNING:
Please bring ideas for collecting and/or outreach events for this summer and for the fall. National Moth week is coming up!

Family and friends are welcome, and carpooling is encouraged.
The potluck and silent auction will begin at 6, and the meeting will start around 7:30.

Hope to see you then!

Apr 212014
 

I am pleased to announce the winners of our student talks, which were held this past Friday at UConn. The meeting was well attended by members, guests, and even a few walk-in students from UConn. It was wonderful to see so much support for our students! I am grateful for everyone who helped organize and judge the event.

The judges were myself, Marta Wells, and Goudarz Molaei. We scored the presenters on their delivery, organization, research content, knowledge, and timing. We were impressed by the quality of the presentations and the students’ abilities to answer tough questions. All of the scores were very close, which is why I was pleased to offer prizes for all participants. Prizes included BioQuip gift cards, a CT EntSoc calendar, and a freshly made insect killing jar.

You can see the talk titles here
Results:

10 minute talks
1st: Melissa Bernardo
2nd: Raymond Simpson
3rd: Cera Fisher
runner up: Benedict Gagliardi

5 minute talks
1st: Joseph Desisto
2nd: Robert Clark
3rd: Emily Johnson
runner up: Kassie Urban-Mead

It was wonderful to get updated on projects I have not heard about in a while, and also to hear about new and exciting research happening in entomology labs in the state. I am confident that next year we will continue this trajectory and have another group of thoughtful and entertaining student talks.