Apr 162015
 

519th MONTHLY MEETING

April 17th, 2015

20140911_142942

All monthly meetings are open to the public. If you are interested in insects, please join us!
Members may bring exhibits for show-and-tell. If you have photos, video, or other media to share, please email the society.

This is our yearly student competition – featuring some of the brightest up-and-coming entomologists in Connecticut. Their talks will be judged, with prizes awarded to all participants. We are hoping for robust attendance, as these students have worked very hard to prepare, and deserve an attentive audience.

10 Minute talks:

Joseph DeSisto
University of Connecticut, undergraduate
Centipedes in the Mist: A New Species from Southern Appalachia

Kathryn Culhane
Yale University, undergraduate
Context dependence of lizard prey communities in the Greek Archipelago

Katie Taylor
University of Connecticut, PhD student
Testing for interspecific hybridization in wild Chrysoperla carnea group lacewings

Kevin Keegan
University of Connecticut, PhD student
Saving the Metalmark in CT

5 Minute talks:

Matthew Nochisaki
High school student
The Secret to Idolomantis

Gwen Antell
Yale University, undergraduate
Stone Flies and Rock Crawlers: Fossil Insects from the Eocene

Anna Sjodin
University of Connecticut, PhD student
The Bugs’ Bugs: Understanding the Role of Blood-Feeding Insect Diversity in Disease Transmission

Raymond Simpson
Yale University, PhD student
Memorable finds of the 2014 field season

Dinner

  • 6:00pm, Willington Pizza House (menu)
  • 25 River Road (Route 32), Willington, CT 06279 (map)

Meeting:

  • 7:30pm, University of Connecticut
  • Biology and Physics Building rm 130, 91 North Eagleville Road, Storrs, CT 06269 (map)
  • Please park in the lot near the visitor’s center (across from North Garage). Parking on the road, or in student lots near the dorms, risks getting a ticket.

Social gathering:

  • TBD
Mar 112015
 

518th MONTHLY MEETING

March 27th, 2015

uconn_collectionsAll monthly meetings are open to the public. If you are interested in insects, please join us!
Members may bring exhibits for show-and-tell. If you have photos, video, or other media to share, please email the society.

JOD_drawersSPEAKER: Jane O’Donnell

TITLE: Reflections on Collections

Dr. Jane O’Donnell has been the collection manager of the University of Connecticut’s insect collection for the past 35 years. She shall regale us with tales of the past, present, and future of UConn’s collections.

Her talk will be followed by a tour of the collections.

Dinner

  • 6:00pm, Willington Pizza House (menu)
  • 25 River Road (Route 32), Willington, CT 06279 (map)

Meeting:

  • 7:30pm, University of Connecticut
  • Biology and Physics Building rm 130, 91 North Eagleville Road, Storrs, CT 06269 (map)

Social gathering:

  • TBD

Links:

 

Feb 072015
 

517th MONTHLY MEETING

February 20th, 2015

All monthly meetings are open to the public. If you are interested in insects, please join us!
Members may bring exhibits for show-and-tell. If you have photos, video, or other media to share, please email the society.

CALENDARS FOR SALE! The calendar photo contest is over, you can see the winners HERE
Click HERE to purchase a calendar

Calendars will be available at the meeting. Any pre-ordered calendars can be picked up at the meeting, or will be shipped to you.

SPEAKER: Geoffrey Attardo

TITLE: “Got Milk? Live birth, lactation and the unique reproductive biology of tsetse flies.”

ABSTRACT: “Tsetse flies (Family: Glossinidae) function as the sole vectors of African Sleeping Sickness (African trypanosomiasis) throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Besides their role as vectors of human and animal disease, tsetse flies have an amazing array of adaptations which distinguish them from other disease vectors and indeed most insects in general. This talk will cover one of the most amazing of those adaptations which is tsetse’s reproductive biology. Tsetse flies give birth to live fully developed larvae. These larvae are developed individually and are provided nutrients during their development within the uterus of the mother. The intrauterine larvae are fed milk like secretions which come from a specialized gland in the mother. We will explore the biology behind this amazing process and learn about some of the recent discoveries illuminated by the entry of tsetse flies into the era of genomics and molecular biology.”

Dinner

  • 6:00pm, catered

Peabody tour

  • 6:45, led by Larry Gall

Meeting:

  • 7:30pm, Yale University
  • Kline Geology Auditorium
Jan 082015
 

516th MONTHLY MEETING

January 16th, 2015

Members Showcase!

calendar_cover calendar_back

All monthly meetings are open to the public. If you are interested in insects, please join us!
Members may bring exhibits for show-and-tell. If you have photos, video, or other media to share, please email the society.

CALENDARS FOR SALE! The calendar photo contest is over, you can see the winners HERE
Click HERE to purchase a calendar

Calendars will be available at the meeting. Any pre-ordered calendars can be picked up at the meeting, or will be shipped to you.

SPEAKER: Whoever would like to participate!

This meeting is all about our members – celebrating what we all do in our lives to embrace entomology. If you would like to participate, please email the society with:

Your name
Your proposed topic
Your proposed time (between 5 and 15 minutes)

You may prepare a powerpoint presentation, bring specimens (alive or dead), share photos, or simply tell a story.

Dinner

  • 6:00pm, Iguana Ranas, 484 Main St. Middletown CT (link)

Meeting:

  • 7:30pm, Wesleyan University
  • Shanklin Hall, rm 107 (map)
Nov 102014
 

515th MONTHLY MEETING

November 21st, 2014

calendar_cover calendar_back

All monthly meetings are open to the public. If you are interested in insects, please join us!
Members may bring exhibits for show-and-tell. If you have photos, video, or other media to share, please email the society.

CALENDARS FOR SALE! The calendar photo contest is over, you can see the winners HERE
Click HERE to purchase a calendar

Calendars will be available at the meeting. Any pre-ordered calendars can be picked up at the meeting, or will be reserved and shipped once the meeting is over.

SPEAKER: Phil Armstrong

TITLE: The Diversity of Mosquito-borne Viruses in Connecticut

Now that the mosquitoes are done buzzing around our heads for the season, Phil Armstrong of the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station will tell us about the dangers lurking in those little blood-suckers.

“Research focuses on the molecular evolution and epidemiology of mosquito-borne viruses transmitted in New England, including eastern equine encephalitis, Jamestown Canyon, and West Nile virus.  Genetic relationships of these viruses are compared to track the origin, spread, and long-term persistence of strains involved in disease outbreaks and to identify variants associated with different ecological niches and/or disease outcomes. Other projects evaluate the role of different mosquito species to serve as vectors of arboviruses by determining their host-feeding and virus-infection patterns in nature. In addition, our group develops and evaluates diagnostic assays to rapidly detect new and established arboviruses transmitted in the U.S.”

Dinner

  • 6:30pm, catered

Meeting:

  • 7:30pm, Yale University
  • Kline Geology Auditorium, 210 Whitney Ave (next to the Peabody) (Map)

Links:

Phil Armstrong’s page at CAES

 

 

 

Oct 212014
 

It’s time to vote in our yearly calendar photo contest!

CLICK HERE TO VOTE

voting_2014 copy

You can choose up to 12 favorites. Please only vote once, but you can encourage your family and friends to participate.

Voting will close October 24th – this is a quick voting period to ensure we can put the calendar together and have it ordered/delivered in time for the November meeting.

Oct 062014
 

514th MONTHLY MEETING

October 17th, 2014

All monthly meetings are open to the public. If you are interested in insects, please join us!
Members may bring exhibits for show-and-tell. If you have photos, video, or other media to share, please email the society.

CALENDAR CONTEST SUBMISSIONS: Please submit one or two photos to our photo contest! All current members may participate. Please see THIS PAGE for details. The deadline is October 15, and we will begin voting at the meeting.

SPEAKERSClaire Rutledge and Kirby Stafford

TITLE: Response to Emerald Ash Borer in Connecticut

Claire and Kirby, both of the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station, are going to discuss the ways in which Connecticut is responding to the threat of the Emerald Ash Borer.

Dinner

  • 6:30pm, catered in the auditorium

Meeting:

  • 7:30pm, Yale University
  • Kline Geology Auditorium, 210 Whitney Ave (next to the Peabody) (Map)

Social gathering:

  • TBD

Links:

See the Ag station’s page on the Emerald Ash Borer here

 

 

 

Sep 122014
 

This year, international rock flipping day (started in 2007) is September 14th. But you can celebrate every day!

“The point is simply to have fun, and hopefully learn something at the same time. We don’t want to over-determine what that something should be: those of a more scientific frame of mind might focus on IDs or ecological interactions, while those of an artistic or poetic bent could go in a different direction entirely…

Whatever you do, please be sure to replace all rocks that you flip as soon as possible, so as not to disrupt the natives’ lives unduly.”

 

See this post by Gwen Pearson to learn more. She blogs at Wired.com, with her column “Charismatic Minifauna”. She is a wonderfully witty entomologist, I highly recommend following her pieces.

Sep 112014
 

The Connecticut State Museum of Natural History is offering a variety of outreach programs this fall, one of which is on using stream insects to evaluate water quality. It sounds like a fun event for adults and children alike, see their website for more details!

Paula Coughlin, Science Educator
Saturday, September 27, 10 am to 12 noon
Pomfret, CT (directions will be sent to participants)
Advance registration required: $15 ($10 for Museum members)
Adults and children ages 5 and above. Children must be accompanied by an adult.

Connecticut’s streams play an important role in maintaining a healthy environment. While they may appear to be crystal clear, the water quality in some streams can be questionable. The presence of certain aquatic insects can be indicators of water quality as some types of aquatic life are more sensitive to pollutants than others. Join naturalist and science educator Paula Coughlin and explore a small stream to learn about a community of aquatic insects that are water quality indicators. Bring appropriate footwear for moderate hiking and boots or old sneakers that can get wet. Dress for mucking about in the stream. Special nets and waders will be provided during this family friendly activity.

Registration form can be found here.